The Threshold of Damnation

Men are brought low indeed when the sound of Aaron’s bell will not awaken them. No sermon will stir them. They are like the blacksmith’s dog that can lie and sleep near the anvil when all the sparks fly about. Conscience is in a lethargy. Once a man’s speech is gone and his feeling lost, he draws on apace to death. So when the checks of conscience cease and a man is sensible neither of sin nor wrath, you may ring out the bell. He is past hope of recovery. Thus some are brought low, even to a reprobate sense. This is the threshold of damnation. “Mischief of Sin” pg. 8

Affliction is Good for Us

There is more malignity in a drop of sin than in a sea of affliction, for sin is the cause of affliction, and the cause is more than the effect. The sword of God’s justice lies quiet in the scabbard till sin draws it out. Affliction is good for us: ‘It is good for me that I have been afflicted’ (Psa. 119:71). Affliction causes repentance (II Chron. 33:12). The viper, being stricken, casts up its poison; so, God’s rod striking us, we spit away the poison of sin. Affliction betters our grace. Gold is purest, and juniper sweetest, in the fire. Affliction prevents damnation (I Cor. 11:32). “Doctrine of Repentance”  pg. 49