Every Man is Bound in Fetters

Every man is by is bound in fetters. A man that is in fetters, if you use arguments, and persuade him to go, is that sufficient? There must be a breaking of his fetters, and setting him free, before he can walk. So it is with every natural man; he is fettered with corruption; now the Lord by converting grace must file off his fetters, nay, give him legs to run too, or he can never obtain salvation. “All Things for Good” pg. 113

A Hard Heart is a Receptacle for Satan

The justice of God, like the angel, stands with a drawn sword in its hand ready to strike, but sinners have not eyes as good as those of Balaam’s ass to see the sword. God smites on men’s backs, but they do not, as Ephraim did, smite upon their thigh (Jer. 31:19). It was a sad complaint the prophet took up: ‘thou hast stricken them, but they have not grieved’ (Jer. 5:3). That is surely reprobate silver which contracts hardness in the furnace. ‘In the time of his distress did he trespass yet more against the Lord: this is that king Ahaz’ (II Chron. 28:22). A hard heart is a receptacle for Satan. As God has two place He dwells in, heaven and a humble heart, so the devil has two places he dwells in, hell and a hard heart. It is not falling into water that drowns, but lying in it. It is not falling into sin that damns, but lying in it without repentance: ‘having their conscience seared with a hot iron’ (I Tim. 4:2). “Doctrine of Repentance”  pg 62

Original Sin in the Believer

Original sin, though latent in the soul, and as a spring which runs underground, often breaks forth unexpectedly. Christian, you cannot believe that evil which is in your heart, and which will break forth suddenly, if God should leave you. “Is thy servant a dog that he should do this great thing” (II Kings 8:13)? Hazael could not believe he had such a root of bitterness in his heart, that he should rip up the women with child. Is thy servant a dog? Yes, and worse than a dog, when that original corruption within is stirred up. If one had come to Peter and said, Peter, within a few hours you will deny Christ, he would have said, “Is your servant a dog?” But alas! Peter did not know his own heart, nor how far that corruption within would prevail upon him. The sea may be calm, and look clear; but when the wind blows how it rages and foams! So though now your heart seems good, yet when temptation blows, how may original sin discover itself, making you foam with lust and passion. “A Body of Divinity” pgs. 145-6

Sin Hangs Weights Upon Us

Original sin may be compared to that fish Pliny speaks of, a sea-lamprey, which cleaves to the keel of the ship and hinders it when it is under sail. Sin hangs weights upon us so that we move but slowly to heaven. O this adherence of sin! Paul shook the viper which was on his hand into the fire (Acts 28:5), but we cannot shake off original corruption in this life. Sin does not come as a lodger for a night, but as an indweller: ‘sin that dwelleth in me’ (Rom. 7:17). It is with us as with one who has a hectic fever upon him; though he changes the air, yet still he carries his disease with him. Original sin is inexhaustible. This ocean cannot be emptied. Though the stock of sin spends, yet it is not at all diminished. The more we sin, the fuller we are of sin. Original corruption is like the widow’s oil which increased by pouring out. “Doctrine of Repentance” pg. 73

Original Sin

Original sin may be compared to that fish Pliny speaks of, a sea-lamprey, which cleaves to the keel of the ship and hinders it when it is under sail. Sin hangs weights upon us so that we move but slowly to heaven. O this adherence of sin! Paul shook the viper which was on his hand into the fire (Acts 28:5), but we cannot shake off original corruption in this life. Sin does not come as a lodger  for a night, but as an indweller: ‘sin that dwelleth in me’ (Rom. 7:17). It is with us as with one who has a hectic fever upon him; though he changes the air, yet still he carries his disease with him. Original sin is inexhaustible. This ocean cannot be emptied. Though the stock of sin spends, yet it is not at all diminished. The more we sin, the fuller we are of sin. Original corruption is like the widow’s oil which increased by pouring out. “Doctrine of Repentance” pg. 73

The Natural Man has No Discernment

An ignorant man looks at a star and it appears to him like a little silver spot, but the astronomer, who has his instrument to judge the dimension of a star, knows it to be many degrees bigger than the earth. So a natural man hears of the heavenly country that it is very glorious, but it is at a great distance. And because he has not a spirit of discernment, the world looks bigger in his eye. But such as are spiritual artists, who have the instrument of faith to judge heaven, will say it is by far the better country and they will hasten there with the sails of desire. “The Godly Man’s Picture” pg. 112

Sin May be Curbed, and Not Cured

The dog has a mind to the bone, but is afraid of the club; so men have a mind to lust, but conscience stands as the angel, with flaming sword, and affrights: they have a mind to revenge, but the fear of hell is a curb-bit to check them. There is no change of heart; sin is curbed, but not cured. A lion may be in chains, but is a lion still. “A Body of Divinity” pg. 244

The Heart of a Man by Nature is like a Garrison

The heart and sin are like two lovers who cannot endure to be parted. . . The heart of a man by nature is like a garrison which holds out in war. Though articles of peace are offered, though it is straightly besieged and one bullet after another is shot, yet the garrison holds out. So the heart is a garrison that holds out against God. Though He uses entreaties, gives warnings, shoots bullets into the conscience, yet the garrison of the heart holds out. The man will not be reclaimed; he sins still. He is said to have a brow of brass, in regard to his impudence, and a sinew of iron, in regard to his obstinance, Isa. 48:4. “Mischief of Sin” pgs. 55-56

The Threshold of Damnation

Men are brought low indeed when the sound of Aaron’s bell will not awaken them. No sermon will stir them. They are like the blacksmith’s dog that can lie and sleep near the anvil when all the sparks fly about. Conscience is in a lethargy. Once a man’s speech is gone and his feeling lost, he draws on apace to death. So when the checks of conscience cease and a man is sensible neither of sin nor wrath, you may ring out the bell. He is past hope of recovery. Thus some are brought low, even to a reprobate sense. This is the threshold of damnation. “Mischief of Sin” pg. 8